Showbizreporting's Blog

January 18, 2011

Who Am I Trailer

Filed under: Entertainment — showbizreporting @ 3:02 pm
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This is your chance to see some of the hard work that I have been up to lately.  As you know my business partner, Dave Andrews, and I got a great response from some of you for our kickstarter campaign for our TV Pilot called Who Am I?  For those of you that did contribute thank you very much and your gifts are being worked on and will be sent out soon.  We finished off our campaign with $29,040 pledged putting us over our $25,000 goal.  The pilot is going to be made and actually starts filming on Feb. 4th.  In the meantime we made a Trailer for the Pilot which through the company 3D Eye, is going to be converted into 3D and give us some good advertising for the show to find some networks to air on and become a full series.  The first of our trailers and the one that will be converted is now available to be seen on our company, Syzygy Holdings’ website at http://www.syzygynetwork.com/wai/trailer-rough.html.  I hope that you enjoy it and will continue to spread the word and support the show.
Thanks,
Scott

December 8, 2009

SAG, AFTRA FACE DEADLINE

SAG, AFTRA face deadline
Unions must decide soon if they are to negotiate together
By DAVE MCNARY

The Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists are facing a looming deadline within the next few months if they’re going to negotiate together on the primetime-feature contract with the majors.
The performers unions haven’t yet taken any formal steps toward joint bargaining, even with SAG obligated to begin seven weeks of negotiations with the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers on Oct. 1. The current SAG and AFTRA master contracts — negotiated separately for the first time in three decades — both expire on June 30, 2011.

AFTRA president Roberta Reardon has held informal discussions recently with SAG prexy Ken Howard about the issue. She admitted that a decision by AFTRA will probably be made before the end of the first quarter, given that both unions require several months for a “wages and working conditions” process of meetings with members to hammer out contract proposals prior to the start of bargaining.

“We’ve had a lot of internal discussion about joint negotiations but we haven’t formalized anything,” she told Daily Variety. “We would do it if it were something that’s to the advantage of all our members.”

SAG declined to comment on Reardon’s statements.

Reardon noted that AFTRA’s also facing looming expirations on two of its other major contracts — sound recordings, which expires June 30; and network code, which ends on Nov. 15. The AFTRA netcode pact covers about $400 million in annual earnings from dramatic programs in syndication or outside primetime, daytime serial dramas, gameshows, talkshows, variety and musical programs, news, sports, reality shows and promotional announcements.

“We have a little bit of a pileup in terms of scheduling,” Reardon added.

She also said that no definitive steps have been taken toward a SAG-AFTRA merger, voted down by SAG members in 1999 and 2003, indicating that combining the unions remains a long-term goal. “I got into AFTRA politics eight years ago because I believe that performers should be in a single union, but if we’re going to do that, we need to take the time to do it right,” she added.

Relations between SAG and AFTRA hit a low early last year when AFTRA angrily split off from joint negotiations over jurisdiction and reached its own primetime deal. SAG — which still hadn’t shifted control to the moderates — then blasted terms of the pact, which had a relatively low 62% ratification. With SAG not reaching a deal until a year later, AFTRA was able to sign up the lion’s share of this year’s TV pilots that were shot digitally.

In the fall of 2008, AFTRA and SAG agreed to a separate deal aimed at ending the bickering between the unions. Brokered by the AFL-CIO, the agreement included “nondisparagement” language along with fines and other discipline for violators; the unions then agreed to joint negotiations on the commercials contract and reached a new three-year deal with the ad industry last spring.

But the enmity toward AFTRA remains strong in some SAG quarters. Its Hollywood board passed a resolution in May to explore the “acquisition” of actors repped through AFTRA, leading to an AFL-CIO umpire warning SAG it would face “severe” fines for any further discussions of an “acquisition” and ordering the guild to officially disavow the statement.

SAG’s Membership First faction, which controls the Hollywood board, staunchly opposes any merger and contends that SAG should represent all acting work. Howard campaigned as the head of the Unite For Strength ticket, which explicitly advocates combining the unions.

“We should merge to create a single powerful union that covers all the work we do, making it impossible for our employers to divide us,” the faction has noted. “That’s what Unite for Strength is all about.”

SAG and AFTRA have shared jurisdiction over primetime series and the long-standing agreement has been that SAG reps all projects shot on film, while SAG and AFTRA have an equal shot at projects shot electronically. With more primetime skeins shot in high-def digital formats, AFTRA’s electronic purview has greatly expanded in the past two years as nearly all primetime pilots went AFTRA.

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118012309.html?categoryId=13&cs=1

June 3, 2009

LA TIMES: SAG TO LAY OFF 35 WORKERS TO HELP CLOSE DEFICITS (APR. 21, 2009)

Filed under: Entertainment — showbizreporting @ 12:40 am
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SAG to cut lay off 35 workers to help close deficit

Hollywood’s largest actors union is suffering from a drop in investment income and shrinking dues, which are based on how much members earn.

By Richard Verrier

April 21, 2009

Hollywood’s largest actors union is cutting 8% of its staff in the face of investment losses and declining membership dues.

The Screen Actors Guild plans to lay off about 35 workers to help close a $6.5-million deficit in the union’s fiscal 2009 budget. The cuts affect several departments and include those who work in the union’s organizing and information technology departments, according to people familiar with the matter. Affected workers will be notified this week. SAG has about 440 employees.

David White, interim director of the Screen Actors Guild, briefed board members Saturday on the planned layoffs when they approved the union’s annual $60-million annual budget. White told board members the cuts were needed to balance the union’s budget and leave enough cash in reserve to cover at least six months of operations.

SAG’s revenue has been hit on two fronts: investment income, which is down sharply because of the decline in stock markets, and membership dues, which are tied to how much actors earn.

Fewer actors have been working as studios curtail production on movies and TV shows. SAG also has lost work to its rival union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, whose labor contracts now dominate prime-time TV pilots.

At the same time, SAG’s expenses have risen sharply. Over the last two years, the guild has added 100 people to its staff, partly for organizational outreach activities. 

The Writers Guild of America, West, recently cut 10% of its staff to close a budget shortfall, which guild officials blamed on investment losses and a sharp falloff in jobs for writers during the last year, when the guild waged a 100-day strike.

richard.verrier@latimes.com

Link – http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-ct-sag21-2009apr21,0,4036624.story

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